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20120926
20121004
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
and others passed it. >> brian: it is what is on the ground and senators have foreign policy experience. how does that factor when they go head-to-head. >> wait, wait, wait. four years of foreign policy experience, i mean, right before that, with due respect to the president of the united states, he just had a couple in the united states senate and state legislator. i don't think that there is a material difference in experience on that front because the governor is chief executive of a state but also commander in chief. you have direct experience with how military works and bain capital covers the globe. you understand how international markets work. i think you can certainly pick out deficiency on the governor's side from the stand point of foreign policy. but understanding both markets and again, the political of having one branch under control and accountablity of that. >> steve: you know what governors do because you did in in south carolina. thank you for joining us. >> brian: coming up, keep your kid no, sir school or lose your welfare benefits. we'll debate it. >> steve: ladies, talk
directly to foreign policy, one would think that the first question that the debate will be exactly about benghazi? >> i would think so. if i were governor romney i would turn to president obama and ask him directly, why were you so reluctant to call this a terrorist attack two weeks after the intelligence agencies and senior pentagon officials had identified it as such? formally identified as a terrorist attack from the very beginning. and you went asked on "the view" directly was this a terrorist attack, wouldn't answer the question. that is fair question for governor romney. then he has to poif have the to a broader argument, a bigger critique of president obama and american leadership. bill: there will be a lot more to be said in the coming five or six days. debate number one. steve hayes, thank you. to viewers at home go to foxnews.com /americasnewsroom. there is a bya box. leave a question about what you would like asked during the debates. read twitter from bill hemmer. martha: he believes the attacks has spiked and the president is now engaged in character assassination against hi
and advance our values in the modern world. >> let me turn to foreign policy. what should be done about syria, in your judgment? >> >> i mean, there is unspeakable slaughter going on there. >> unspeakable but nothing is being done, except supply arms to -- >> you have got three things going on, haven't you? you have got a challenge from the people to the government, that is how this all started. u have got sectarian conflicts between the diffent ommuties of syria with support from the different regional powers, iran, saudi, et cetera, and you have then got the geo politics, u.s. and uk on one side and russia on the other. i think the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others aund the tab. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >> they alrea
on when dealing with al qaeda specifically and terrorism and foreign policy and this was frankly a disaster for the united states and a terrible tragedy so they see this as a way to criticize some of the president's policies in the region. >> brown: steven lee myers, daniel byman, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> woodruff: now to our american graduate series on the high school dropout problem. tonight, we explore the pressures on a public school system in a city that's unexpectedly benefiting from economic good times. ray suarez has our story from north dakota. >> reporter: there is no better economic view in the u.s. than the one seen from above williston, north dakota. a rapidly expanding oil boom has taken root below, bringing with it widespread prosperity and an unemployment rate that sits at just 1%. this city's fortunes are in stark contrast to most of the nation. real estate is profitable. blue collar jobs are abundant. and much of the globe, including asia, the middle east and europe, is investing in the local economy. but as opportunities and new residents pour in, it
will look at the issue of foreign policy on this year's presidential campaign. a political science professor at norfolk state university will focus on the role of virginia in the election. we will also be joined by the editor in chief of the washington monthly to discuss a recent article in the magazine examining the consumer financial protection juror -- protection bureau. >> september 11, 2001, was a day that changed my life forever. i will go through a presentation, able ally in the account of the historical account of the attack as things transpired that day. a lot of things happened very quickly. i will do my best not to ramble on and go too fast. i would ask you to sit back and clear your mind and put yourself in that room and you'll get a real sense of what it was like to be at the top of the food chain. >> more from a retired lieutenant colonel robert darling. this weekend on american history tv, sunday at 7:30 on c-span3. >> the former ambassador to pakistan says the u.s. needs a new approach in its relationship with that country. he spoke for the first time since returning from isl
branches right now? >> i noted in the survey of american public opinion on foreign policy which just came out recently, there were very strange attitudes of americans regarding the middle east. a large majority saw it as the region of the world's most likely to create stress to the national security of the united states. there is a general trend of wanting less involvement militarily, economically, and so forth with this region. along with what david said, public opinion and how voters and citizens feel about the involvement of their country in the middle east is another issue. >> i would like to enter with certain details. it is very tricky and a very important. they may have problems, but the european union will continue to exist without any doubt. that is my position and my belief. for that part of the world, we are talking about our neighborhood. and therefore, the stability there is for migration, many things related to that mediterranean sea. it will be our priority for ever. it is always in the attention of any prime minister of the european union. more intensely in the south, and
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)